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Nextcloud is the one stop solution if you want a simple and yet powerful backup server for your home or work. Nextcloud is similar to dropbox.

The difference is that former is open source. Also Nextcloud eliminates any third party intrusion, so your data always stays with you and never leaves your server. Assuming you have Ubuntu 16.04 installed, let’s get started.

Installation

The installation is quite easy as there are automated scripts ready by our great GitHub community.

I also wanted to write about how to do this manually but there are so many configurations that even ten posts wouldn’t be sufficient. So I trust this script. Scripts essentially saves you a lot of time. Having said that always make sure you read each line of script thouroughly before running any of them.

Some scripts could potentially open backdoors in your system.

The original script by TechAndMe requires 2 GB RAM on your server(which sadly I don’t have). So I modified the script a bit for my 1 GB server. You can use whichever script you want.

Open an SSH window to your server.

Get the latest install script from master:

wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/e-sean/vm/master/nextcloud_install_production.sh

Run the script

sudo bash nextcloud_install_production.sh

Follow the on screen instructions which are quite easy. Read them carefully.

When the installation finishes, your machine will reboot. This time login with the new user that you created within the script. And the script will install some more components to your server.

If the script does not run after reboot, then type in the command below

sudo -u <user> sudo bash /var/scripts/nextcloud-startup-script.sh

After everything is finished installing, go to your server ip/nextcloud and login to find your new backup server ready.

For RaspberryPi

There is a modified version for RaspberryPi too. So your little Pi can become your data saver!

More info and original script is here.